Tag Archives: Ubuntu

Critical error on Couchapp push with Ubuntu

I am hoping that in posting this, someone is able to save a little time and frustration.

On my Ubuntu 10.10 machine with CouchDB 1.0.1 installed, I began experiencing the following error every time I attempted to ‘couchapp push’ my couchapp changes:

[CRITICAL] Expecting object: line 2 column 3 (char 4)

After a bit of noggin scratching (and perhaps a little mumbled cussing), I started thinking about the fact I had not upgraded my couchapp install since long before I last upgraded CouchDb.

Running the following cleared up all error and put me back in the happy land of  ’couchapp push’:

“easy_install -U couchapp”

Yup… Just a version issue…  Hope this saves someone a few gray hairs…

 

-Matt

nVidia Drivers with Compositing on Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

nVidia LogoOk.  I will admit it.  I love compositing (Compiz) in Linux.  I absolutely adore it.  Clearly, this can be a bit of a problem as compositing on NVidia cards (more specifically using the Linux proprietary drivers) in Linux can be a bit of a challenge (understatement) at times.

Post-Lucid-upgrade has proven to be one of these times.  After having a smooth dist-upgrade and eventually a full, fresh install on my Eee 1000HE, I decided to forge forward with installing Lucid (x86 – reasons for we can debate elsewhere)from scratch on my custom built desktop recently.  As was the case with my netbook, Lucid installed largely without a hitch (See previous Grub post).

Once up and running, I of course wanted to get nVidia up and running.  For some reason on my SLI enabled (dual 8500GTs) desktop, I have never been able to get the repo nVidia drivers to work without issue.  Unfortunately after some trial and error, I was unable to get the nVidia supplied drivers up and running – after reading through some Lucid docs, I found out that the newest nVidia driver is currently incompatible with some of the system changes made with Lucid.

Fortunately, this time, the ‘nvidia-current’ from the repos did work for me!  Here is what I did to get it up and running in case you encounter the same ‘black screen errors that I did when installing from within Gnome.  I can’t say why it didn’t work in the GUI for me, but it didnt…

First, I had to get into a working shell by booting into “recovery mode” from grub – its a menu option below your normal boot item.  Once prompted, I selected netroot, which provides network access from the shell.  To get things installed properly, I had to get to init level 3:
$ initlevel 3

Then log in using your normal user login.

Get needed files:
$ sudo apt-get install build-essential linux-headers-`uname -r’

Blacklist nouveau by adding ‘blacklist nouveau’ to your blacklist.conf:
$ sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

Install latest stabled nVidia repo drivers:
$ sudo apt-get install nvidia-current

Finally, generate the nVidia xorg.conf:
$ sudo nvidia-xconfig

After completing the above, I was able to reboot (“$ sudo reboot now“) into my nVidia backed Gnome desktop and finish completing my nVidia setup (ALT+F2, “gksu nvidia-settings“).  Then finally, I was able to get my Compiz back up and running – which came with its own problems and will be covered in another post!

Hope this helps!
-Matt

Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx) Upgrade – 1000HE EeePC

So… I decided to bite the bullet and forge forward with the dist upgrade from 9.10 to 10.04 last night… Ok, so let’s be honest – I let curiosity take control once again, allowing my cautious mind to be overridden: allowing the entry of ‘sudo update-manager -d’ in the terminal…
This was about 11PM last night – I awoke to about 90% completion about 6am… This in itself gave rise to concern with me – not that it actually ‘means’ anything in itself, but – well, I just know that a lot is being swapped out in this release and the removal of HAL alone has had me nervous (I understand the decision, but such changes can mean fun for early adopters).
I am however happy to say that everything seems to be working great after the upgrade to 10.04. I haven’t had time to put it through its paces properly, but all systems currently seem go and all seems to be functioning at least as well as before – always a welcome thing when moving to an Alpha release of Ubuntu.

Kudos, Ubuntu team! This Alpha upgrade has been the smoothest for me to date…

I will post back if I encounter anything – neat and new or newly broken…